About your Search

20100901
20100930
STATION
CSPAN 24
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
. we had to fly over that. we had to make our own rules. it was pretty incredible. the decision for us in the washington area to get everyone down on the ground was a quick one. my supervisor made the decision on his own. it was a great decisn. that part of our job was done. the big part was setting up a fighter cap and identifying all of the other aircraft and things coming and going in the air space. was really an incredible few hours. >> you mentioned a couple of years back in the circumstance stuck with me. during this time as you have all the fighters over the city, you are breaking all of theules. you had created your own rules on howou operate this day. there was an aircraft coming into d.c. -- obviously a government aircraf you have determined how you were going to thread it through all the fighters circling the city. your supervisor walked into the room. >> when the attorney general is coming in, that is a different story. we will get to that if we have time. we did not know who it was. andrews aiforce base was recovering military leaders to go in there and do what they had to
for bringing us all together to talk about these very important issues. i have been asked to talk about racial profiling in the context of emigrants. there have been many waves of american history in which there have been anti-democrat laws and policies, but that the federal and state and city level. starting about five years ago, there has been a more recent wave, and states and cities across the country started proposing and enacting laws that were essentially designed to make life very hard for emigrants and to try to drive them out. in the last five years the state legislators have enacted reject proposed thousands of anti- immigrant laws. -- who have proposed thousands of anti-democrat loss. one of those mentioned here was the pennsylvania law, which is a law that prohibited undocumented immigrants from granting and restricted employment as well. there have been similar laws all across the country in places like farmers branch, texas. riverside, new jersey. in arizona, which is a very active state in this regard, is not the first and will not be the last. several years ago arizona passed
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
discontent and focus on social crisis. justice.al "u.s. unemployment stands at 9.6%, with michigan at 13.1%. those who do not have jobs are anxious about losing them and watching their benefits declined. incomes are down, and many people are fighting health care expensive or lacking coverage altogether. for many, retirement seems but a dream. the the union is trying to tap into worker discontent and re- commit itself to broader social and justice issues in an effort to rejuvenate its sunken membership level." in "the new york times" there is an article about anna burger. "after all light and labor, a union leader retires, frustrated. she has dedicated her life to building the labor movement but has in nonetheless grown smaller and weaker. beyond a stepping down debt from of federation represents 5 million union members, she is retiring from her job of 14 years as secretary-treasurer of the powerful service employees international union, representing 2 million janitors and other hospital workers. many women have far too hard a time of balancing jobs and family. she is frustrated that unio
to the middle east. >> direct negotiations among the u.s., israel, and the palestinian authority in pursuit of a final agreement, sediment, and just peace of two states living side by side -- settlement. george mitchell will answer a few questions, but we still have meetings going on. he will have to return upstairs to rejoin the negotiations. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. the parties have just concluded the first round of trilateral talks. the meeting lasted about an hour and a half. it began with a plenary session involving the full u.s., israeli, and palestinian delegations on the eighth floor of the state department, and then broke to a smaller meeting in the secretary of state's personal office involving prime minister netanyahu, president abbas, secretary clinton, and myself. prime minister netanyahu and president abbas then went into a separate meeting for a direct discussion. that meeting is still going on right now. in the trilateral meeting, there was a long and productive discussion on a range of issues. president abbas and prime minister netanyahu expressed their inte
. to us your thoughts about a story line of 1994 versus -- give us your thoughts on the story line of 1994 versus 20103 how can democrats governor's mitigate what many are talking about as a wave election? >> first of all, it is a different year, by definition -- i will start with that fact. there are clearly parallels to 1994, and i think there are pretty serious the distinctions. it seems that the series distinctions are that we democrats were asleep at the switch in 1994. we were complacent, we or smog, and to put it bluntly -- we were smug, and to put it bluntly, we were again. that is not the case today. we have been on red alert for a long, long time. no. 2 is that the republicans were identified in 1994. you mentioned this. they were unified in 1994. people forget the contract with -- some of us call it the contract on america. dee dee and i were talking about that. the white house was pretty smug about that. "no one is going to listen to that." newt gingrich, think of him what you may, and we have a lot of him -- he had atampa - lot of thoughts. the tea party has a downside for us
commercial banking system to underpin and facilitate this u.s. economy of ours which is so great. it is time that the largest financial institutions in my words experience a little more tough love. no one escapes. that is it say we should not be tough because they deserve a threshing, because we need sound, robust banks in this country. today, i have offered only a few examples of the complexity of the issues that lawmakers, regulators, and the financial industry face. as with any piece of legislation, some within the public believe it falls far short of its goal. others believe it goes far too far. for the moment, we must implement it as prescribed. it is the law. opponents who are working hard to weaken its implementation and struggling to find loopholes already. others are insisting that it be implemented quickly and without exception as to the broad rules outlined in the legislation. this is to be expected and is part of our political and our capitalistic system. for example, the resolution process that i mentioned includes provisions that could leave it susceptible to political consider
with 31% of the vote. this is about an hour. >> good evening and thank you for joining us for this first gubernatorial debate. >> tonight's debate is brought to you by impact nevada. this is a partnership between ' the las vegas review journal" and pbs. >> rory reid and brian sandoval have released plans for improving education. we will hear from both candidates on this issue. >> the venue for tonight's debate, the andre agassi college preparatory academy. here is a man who really cares about education, andre agassi. [applause] >> thank you. good evening and welcome to the andre agassi college preparatory academy. i want to rory reid and brian sandoval for accepting this invitation to come here to share their thoughts on this vital issue, education. we built this school because we believe nothing has the power to change a child's life like a quality education. without an education a child cannot hope. without a quality system, a state cannot compete. the next governor will long be remembered for the effect on education. nevada is struggling economically. a huge portion of our state budge
to improve not just certain ones. that is the main difference between us. >> you wish to rebut? >> yes. i have read my opponent's plan. in terms of it using empowerment, which we already have, it uses a program that is going to be used in a county in the very near future. i had the opportunity to visit with all 17 school superintendents. the point i think we need to make is as far as it goes, it is fun. but we need to go further. we cannot wait for the five years that is called for in my opponent's plan to change the system. by that time, thousands of children's -- children would have gone through. my plan will allow for change immediately. it will call for immediate merit pay for teachers to reward good teachers. it will call for the end of social promotion. it will give principals throughout the state the ability to have local control for the decisions and kids in their schools. thanks. >> we understand it will be hard to divorce the subject issue from this, but we want to continue with another question. the school district has led the privatizing and have found they could not save the
of medical technology changes over that period of time. you have diseases like pneumonia that used to kill people and now you take a few pills. we have had all these changes and that has not changed the fact that health care -- when we are wealthier, we want to consume more health care. we want to stay healthier. we're willing to pay for it and replace body parts. when you get old, you are replacing these body parts. we have not been able to control that because no one is paying for it. if individuals were paying for it, it might look different. with 60 years of consistent growth, i think we are projecting that time and saying magic will not happen in the next 60 years. we would say the variances small parade you are absolutely right that we do not know what will happen in the future. i think it is largely about incentives. if we are structuring the incentives, we are not making the providers -- we need to take medicare advantage and give people premium support and make medicare all medicare advantage and go out and let them bid to get the customers instead of us telling them what we will
and anger, you are not behind anything that will be prosperous or positive. bringing us a better america where we are not fighting all the time. abraham lincoln even said this. we will falter with them, it will not be an outside force. just look in the mirror. host: all right. independent line, connecticut. caller: a quick comment, it is hard to tell where to party members stand on the issues. if you look at rand hall in kentucky, if you look at the way that they have been constructed and guided, not to speak critically on the issues, it is hard to tell where they stand conservatively. host: going back to "the wall street journal" this morning -- host: also in the papers this morning, an update on the alaska primary, "seeking a way out of the ft." -- out of the ft." -- defeat." host: long island, n.y., republican line. caller: i agree with the editorial. i am as fiscally conservative as you can get, but there is no point in republicans forming a circular firing squad. we need to vote for the people that can vote for the republicans who can win the election and make significant gains in c
this proposal for business tax credit. the numbers -- if you want to send us a message electronically, twitter is c- span-wj and you can also send us an e-mail and that address is journal c-span.org. and we will give you the telephone numbers again. we were having some technical problems. there they are. so, we want to get your thoughts on this. at the numbers, again -- our first call comes from columbus, ohio. gerry on our line for independents. caller: a beautiful day. the reason america tank in 1937 -- i am in my eighties, i am an old man. to have a realize, pump give water you have to prime the pump and you have to spend money and the u.s. chamber of commerce is not spending the money. they are working with the other party. it is just ridiculous. there is no reason why this should not be done. and i wish you guys would get on the fact that where is the money going to come from to spend a $10 trillion that the american society of civil engineers estimates it would take over the next five years to bring the infrastructure up to be-. still waiting for c-span to cover that. where do all these
twitter page, twitter.com/c- spanwj. you can also send us an e-mail as well to journal@c-span.org. a little bit more from this "the wall street journal" article. host: union county, south carolina. good morning, daryl. what you think of these new epa imposed smog rules? caller: it is time to start putting the health and the lives of people above the money. and it is just something that it is never a good time for any kind of support to come for these kinds of changes that we need to clean up our environment. host: all right, let me ask you this, please turn down your television so that we do not get that feed back. but let me ask you, in the article the officials have put on hold plans for a new traffic intersection, saying that the south carolina officials concluded it would more than double the costs by requiring it to be built in a clover leaf shape to reduce traffic jams and pollution levels, limiting growth. what do you think about that? this is in south carolina, your own state. caller: to me, these are excuses that they come up with to not make the changes that n
him lessons that then he goes on to use to great effect later. host: political oper tunist? guest: yes. host: yoo license is s. grant? guest: he is considered one of the highest oper tunists and because of that he gets thrown out, because he really didn't have any political experience before he became president. so is his breath number, the number of positions he eserved end up way outside the norm. host: harry trueman. guest: trueman is one of those interesting things. as i recall, i would have to go back and look at my data. but as i recall he is actually an oper tunist, but it's because he served sort of short term in many of his underlying positions. host: barack obama. guest: he is officially not. but there was one from the 2008 election that actually had one of the highest scores. certainly higher than president clinton. host: why? guest: because he had run for more offices in a short period of time, where as senator clinton, at the time i counted her first lady experience as essentially one position, eight years. so that essentially disadvantages her. host: with barack obama, di
, and think you for joining us. >> tonight's debate is brought to you by impact nevada, a partnership between several news organizations. we are joined by the andre agassi foundation. >> both rory reid and brian sandoval plan to improve education in nevada. >> the venue for the exciting debate is the andre agassi college preparatory academy. here is the man behind it all, a man who cares about education, andre agassi. [applause] >> thank you. good evening and welcome to the andre agassi college preparatory academy. i want to thank both of candidates for accepting our invitation to come here tonight and share their thoughts on one of the most vital issues we face today in our state -- education. as you know, we built this school because we believe that nothing has the power to change a child's life like quality education. without an education, a child cannot hope, cannot dream. without a quality education system, a state cannot compete. the next governor of nevada will long be remembered for the effect he has had on education. like the rest of america, and that is struggling economically. a hu
. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people who become representative of the larger whole, which was essentially the defection of six million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and the west, from 1915, world war i, until 1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend, and they handed me this as i'm going into the movie. i won't tell you what it was, but i want to read it to you. "every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a constant and cheap source of labor for x country's "booming cities. and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens." do you have any idea what country that is? >> well, it could be almost any -- it could be any country, but i'm thinking the united states and southerners. but i wrote this book w
tomorrow to talk about the u.s. economy at the latest afl-cio labor day event. follow the people and events that make history online at the c-span video library. the transfer of a canal, the impeachment of a president, the events of 9/11, watched what happened as it happened, all free any time. it is washington your way. now there is a discussion on the midterm elections. speakers include jonah goldberg. it is part of a conference by the american political science association. this portion is just under an hour and a half. [applause] >> thank you, gene. is a pleasure to be here. people are looking for big republican gains in the midterm elections. low approvals of congress, presidential ratings, a bad ratio of what is called the " right track/wrong track" poor economic conditions and poor perceptions of the economy by voters, an advantage by republicans issue-by-issue on each of the issues that are pulled at the moment, which is a dramatic change from two years ago and four years ago, and sea- by-seat, there is a lot more honorable democrats then bolar republicans. it would seem to be likel
have used -- pack as far as cannabis goes, the vast majority of us have used it. as far as afghanistan and opium, we saw on the news where our soldiers were guarding the poppy fields. we're using our tax dollars to guard the poppy fields. this is a joke. as far as the opium and cocaine, and do not know, that marijuana is not that bad. it should be legalized. i do not use it no more. it is not that big a deal. thank you. guest: 2 richard and all of the other callers, one of the great advantages of living in the american society is we can have this dialogue and you get to this dialogue and you get to speak your piece, but clearly i cannot change the laws and the united states. elected officials get paid to do that. as long as illegal and unlawful, something i believe is correct and we should not be making illegal, then we are duty bound to enforce the laws. respectfully, i would tell you to direct your comments to congress. host: what keeps you awake at night, what worries you the most with respect to the importation of illegal drugs? guest: it is the drug trade and transnational crimina
for us is trying to get our six-party friends led by china to work with us to try to convince who's ever in leadership in north korea that their future would be far better served by denuclearizing, and that remains our goal. >> as always, thank you so much. [laughter] for coming here, first of all, but also giving such a thorough and complete and comprehensive talk about american foreign policy. and i know i speak for everyone that we wish you godspeed and more in your work next week and >> on c-span tonight, president obama talks about the economy during a visit to the ohio. jo bonner holds a town hall meeting in his district. the democratic national committee holds a -- an event in philadelphia. former gov. george pataki focuses on health care. >> at long last, the united states of america joins every other nation in the world to say that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> we have been covering town hall meetings. what's them on line at the c- span a video library. they are searchable and free on your computer any time. the c-span networks -- we provide coverage of politics, p
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)